Notes
1.
Baseline for Change: The Brezhnev Legacy
1.
Jerry F. Hough,
The Struggle for the Third World: Soviet Debates
and American Options
(Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution,
1986).
2.
Roger E. Kanet, "Soviet Attitudes toward Developing Nations
since Stalin," in Roger E. Kanet, ed.,
The Soviet Union and the Develop-
ing Nations
(Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1974), pp.
2~
32
.
3. For a more detailed periodization of Soviet Third World policy
see Francis Fukuyama, "Patterns of Soviet Third World Policy,"
Prob-
lems of Communism,
September-October 1987, pp. 1-13.
4. Roger E. Kanet, "The Soviet Union and the Colonial Question,
1917-1953," in Kanet,
The Soviet Union,
p. 16; Rajan Menon,
Soviet
Power and the Third World
(New Haven: Vale University Press, 1986),
PP·2-4·
5. Daniel S. Papp,
Soviet Policies toward the Developing World during
the 1980s
(Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.: Air University Press, 1986),
p. 194; see also the section on "Diplomacy," in Carol R. Saivetz and
Sylvia Woodby,
Soviet-Third World Relations
(Boulder: Westview,
1985),
pp. 158-65·
6. A list of governments with which the USSR enjoyed diplomatic
relations on 1 January 1991, prepared by the Embassy' of the USSR
in Washington, D.C., contained the following twenty-one Latin
American states: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil,
Venezuela, Guyana, Guatemala, Honduras, Dominican Republic,
Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Surinam,
Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Chile, Ecuador, and Jamaica.
7. Robert S. Leiken,
Soviet Strategy in Latin America
(New York:
Praeger,
1982),
p. 48.
8. W. Raymond Duncan,
The Soviet Union and Cuba: Interests and
Influence
(New York: Praeger, 1985), p. 51.
9. Ibid.
10.
Leon Goure and Morris Rothenberg,
Soviet Penetration of Latin
America
(Coral Gables: University of Miami Press, 1975), p. 31; Timo-
Previous Page Next Page