notes
introduction
1
Adolf Eichmann, “Eichmann’s Own Story: ‘To Sum It All Up, I Regret Nothing,’ ”
Life Magazine, December 5, 1960, 161. The emphasis is mine.
2
Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (New
York: Penguin, 1977), 22.
3
Richard Rorty, “Ethics without Principles,” chap. 4 in Philosophy and Social Hope
(London: Penguin, 1999), 80.
4
Eichmann, “Eichmann’s Own Story,” 158.
5
Eichmann, “Eichmann’s Own Story,” 150.
6
Janet Landman, Regret: The Persistence of the Possible (New York: Oxford Univer-
sity Press, 1993), 257.
7
For a general survey and analysis of such claims, see Thomas Hurka, “Monism,
Pluralism, and Rational Regret,” Ethics 106 (April 1996): 555–575.
8
Hurka, “Monism, Pluralism, and Rational Regret,” 560.
9
Hurka, “Monism, Pluralism, and Rational Regret,” 559.
10
Rorty, “Ethics without Principles,” 79.
11
Rorty, “Ethics without Principles,” 79.
12 Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem, 149.
13
Hannah Arendt, “Thinking and Moral Considerations,” in Responsibility and
Judgment, ed. Jerome Kohn (New York: Schocken, 2003), 180.
14
Arendt, “Thinking and Moral Considerations,” 163.
15
Arendt, “Thinking and Moral Considerations,” 188.
16
Sigmund Freud, “Mourning and Melancholia,” in The Standard Edition of the
Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, vol. 14, trans. and ed. James
Strachey (London: Hogarth, 1994), 245.
17
Freud, “Mourning and Melancholia,” 245.
18
Eugenie Brinkema, The Forms of the Affects (Durham, NC: Duke University
Press, 2014), 58.
19
Brinkema, The Forms of the Affects, 66.
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