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Notes
Introduction
1. Foucault, The History of Sexuality, 103.
2. Ross and Rapp, ‘‘Sex and Society,’’ 53.
3. Somerville, Queering the Color Line; Stoler, Race and the Education of Desire; and the
monumental collection Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology, edited by E. Patrick
Johnson and Mae G. Henderson, revise historical accounts and o√er a new critical
language for analyzing racialized sexualities and the place of sexuality in racial
design. Harper, Are We Not Men; Holland, Raising the Dead; and Muñoz, Disidentifica-
tions centralize gender as they examine the interrelation of sexuality and race in
light of the political aspirations and cultural productions of marginalized popula-
tions. Ferguson, Aberrations in Black; Reid-Pharr, Once You Go Black; and Stockton,
Beautiful Bottom, Beautiful Shame o√er some of the richest analyses of black identity,
intellectual history, and cultural practice through the lens of abjection, drawing on
methodologies derived from sociology, historiography, queer theory, and literary
inquiry. Crossing a wide spectrum of disciplinary locales, these pathbreaking texts
leave their imprint here. I place my study within this rich intellectual community to
announce both its debt and what I hope will be its contribution.
4. Hortense Spillers, ‘‘All the Things You Could Be by Now, If Sigmund Freud’s
Wife Was Your Mother, 378, says it adroitly: ‘‘The individual in the collective tra-
versed by ‘race’–and there are no known exceptions, as far as I can tell—is covered
by it before language and its di√erential laws take hold. It is the perfect a√liction,
if by that we mean an undeniable setup that not only shapes one’s view of things
but demands an endless response from him. Unscientific in the world of ‘proofs,’
governed by the inverted comma, unnatural and preponderant in its grotesque
mandates on the socius, ‘race’ is destiny in the world we have made.’’
5. For readings on the continuing significance of race to making and preserv-
ing American identity, culture, and political economy, see Lubiano, The House That
Race Built. Howard Winant writes, ‘‘Throughout U.S. history, racial conflicts con-
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