ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I am indebted to the work, energy, commitment, and care of the
group of women who are at once the focus and the creative force behind
this project. I thank the women of the WAVE project-Aida Matta, Car-
men Perez, Glenda Smith-Hasty, Juanita Mohammed, Marcia Edwards, and
Sharon Penceal-for their insights and vision into AIDS, video, and the
nature of community. I respect their courage. I value their friendship. Their
work made my work possible.
I have also made AIDS video with many others whom I thank for
their dedication and creativity: the HIV-Video Support Group at Woodhull
Hospital, the Lay-Techs Entertainment Group at Swarthmore College, and
the Audio-Video Department at The Gay Men's Health Crisis.
Of course, to write this book I have watched countless AIDS videos
by friends and respected colleagues. I know that making activist video is
time-consuming, undervalued, and also massively important. To all you
videomakers: keep up this vital work which has soothed, enraged, and uni-
fied so many of us!
Sections of AIDS TV were published in earlier drafts in several
journals and books under the following titles: "Camcorder Politics," Cine-
matograph
4 (1990-91): 79-86;
"The Contained Threat," The Journal of Sex
Research
27,
no.
1
(February
1990): 25-46,
a publication of the Society
for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (P.O. Box
208,
Mount Vernon, Iowa
52314-0208);
"WAVE in the Media Environment," camera obscura
28
(Janu-
ary
1992): 135-52
(Indiana University Press); "So Many Alternatives," Cine-
aste
20,
no.
4 (1994): 32-41,
and
21,
no.
1 (1995);
"From Within," Praxis
3
(1992): 23-46;
and "Knowing AIDS Through the Televised Science Docu-
mentary," Women and AIDS: Psychological Perspectives, ed. Corinne Squire
(London: Sage Publications,
1994), 150-64.
Some of this writing was gen-
erously funded by Amherst College's Copeland Fellowship and a Mellon
Fellowship at Bryn Mawr College.
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