NOTES
1 Introduction to
AIDS
TV
1 See Appendix 1, an annotated videography, by Catherine Saalfield.
2 See Jan Zita Grover, "Visible Lesions: Images of People With AIDS," Afterimage,
Summer
1989,
pp.
10-16.
Grover provides a timeline of AIDS representation from
1981-88,
arguing how gay men, gay media, and gay service organizations were the
first to respond to the damning images of AIDS found in the mainstream media,
creating, instead, images of AIDS with which gay people could identify "because
of shared history and concerns."
3 See, for example, James Meyer, "AIDS and Postmodernism," Arts Magazine, April
1992,
pp.
60-68;
Jeffrey Weeks, "Postmodern AIDS?" in Tessa Boffin and Sunil
Gupta, eds., Ecstatic Anti-Bodies (London: Rivers Oram Press,
1990),
pp.
133-41;
Lee Edelman, "The Mirror and the Tank: 'AIDS,' Subjectivity, and the Rhetoric
of Activism," in Timothy Murphy and Suzanne Poirier, eds., Writing AIDS (New
York: Columbia University Press,
1993),
pp.
9-38.
Murphy writes: "intellectual
efforts to theorize the epidemic, its constructions, and its representations, fre-
quently invoke, toward differing ends and with varying degrees of insight and
engagement, some notion of the postmodern," pp.
10-11.
4 John Greyson, "Strategic Compromises: AIDS and Alternative Video Practices,"
in Mark O'Brien and Craig Little, eds., Reimaging America (Philadelphia: New
Society Publishers,
1990),
p.
61.
5 Greyson, pp.
63
and
73.
6
Jean Carlomusto, "Making IT: AIDS Activist Television," Video Guide, Nov.
1989,
p.18.
7 Catherine Saalfield, "On the Make," in Martha Gever, John Greyson,and Pratibha
Parmar, eds., Queer Looks: Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Film and Video (New
York: Routledge,
1993),
p.
19.
8 In personal discussions with Ginsburg regarding AIDS
TV,
9 Timothy Landers, "Bodies and Anti-Bodies: A Crisis in Representation," in
Cynthia Schneider and Brian Wallis, eds., Global Television (Cambridge, Mass.:
MIT
Press,
1988),
p.
282.
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