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Notes
Introduction
1. Jack Goody, ‘‘Industrial Foods: Towards the Development of a World
Cuisine.’’
2. E. M. Forster, A Passage to India, 48–49. I use the term Anglo-Indian as it was
commonly used in the nineteenth century and early twentieth, to refer to those of
British origin who were domiciled in the subcontinent for the duration of their
service or employment there (and sometimes beyond it).
3. Sanjay Subrahmanyam has suggested, however, that notwithstanding the
rush to find sea routes to the east, Vasco da Gama’s voyage of 1498 was less conclu-
sive in establishing the conduit of the spice trade than has been commonly thought
(Keynote lecture, 22nd Annual South Asia Conference, uc Berkeley, 16 February
2007). For a learned and engaging account of Vasco da Gama’s career, see his The
Career and Legend of Vasco da Gama. Rushdie is mobilizing a more conventional as well
as a more obviously counterfactual historiography here, one that permits a certain
plotting of linked world historical events.
4. Wolfgang Schivelbusch, Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants,
and Intoxicants, trans. David Jacobson, 13.
5. Om Prakash, ‘‘Restrictive Trading Regimes: voc and the Asian Spice Trade
in the Seventeenth Century.’’
6. For a short history of the British East India Company, see Philip Lawson, The
East India Company: A History.
7. Timothy Morton, The Poetics of Spice: Romantic Consumerism and the Exotic, 10.
8. James L. Hevia, ‘‘Opium, Empire, and Modern History,’’ 311.
9. Sidney W. Mintz, Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History and
‘‘Time, Sugar, and Sweetness.’’
10. Hevia, ‘‘Opium, Empire, and Modern History,’’ 313.
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