N O T E S
I N T R O D U C T I O N
1 See William Wei, The Asian American Movement (Philadelphia: Temple
University Press, 1994) for a complete history of the rise of Asian Ameri-
can politics as organized resistance to and critique of government policies
of the past.
2See Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter (Boston: Little, Brown, 1953); John Okada,
No-No Boy (1957; Seattle: University of Washington, 1995); Michi Weglyn,
Years of Infamy: The Untold Story of America’s Concentration Camps (New
York: Morrow, Quill, 1976); Richard Nishimoto, Inside an American Con-
centration Camp: Japanese American Resistance at Poston (Tucson: Univer-
sity of Arizona Press, 1995); Peter Irons, Justice Delayed: The Record of the
Japanese American Internment Cases (Middleton, Conn.: Wesleyan Univer-
sity Press, 1989); Roger Daniels, Concentration Camps, U.S.A.: Japanese
Americans and World War II (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston,
1970); and Hisaye Yamamoto, Seventeen Syllables and Other Stories (La-
tham, N.Y.: Kitchen Table and Women of Color Press, 1988).
3 Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction (New
York: Vintage Books, 1980), 11–12.
4 In conceding that ‘‘the discourse on sex has been multiplied rather than
rarefied,’’ Foucault also points out that ‘‘by speaking about it so much, by
discovering it multiplied, partitioned o¤, and specified precisely where one
had placed it, what one was seeking essentially was simply to conceal sex: a
screen-discourse, a dispersion-avoidance . . . the discourse on sex—the dis-
course of scholars and theoreticians—never ceased to hide the thing it was
speaking about’’ (53).
5 Marita Sturken, ‘‘Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reen-
acting the Japanese Internment,’’ positions 5, no. 3 (winter 1997): 693.
6 Walter Benjamin, Illuminations: Essays and Reflections (1955; New York:
Schocken Books, 1969), 257, 263.
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