noteS
preFAce
1
For reproductions of 1968 Student Movement art, see Grupo
Mira (1988), Aquino and Perezvega (2004), and Ayala (1998).
For examples of grupos movement art, see Liquois (1985a), De-
broise (2006a), García Márquez et al. (1977), and Híjar (2007).
For images of Chicano movement art, see Griswold del Cas-
tillo et al. (1991), Gaspar de Alba (1998), Keller (2002), and
Keller et al. (2004).
2
In 2010 the Instituto de Artes Gráficas de Oaxaca (iago),
located in the city of Oaxaca, completed an extensive digital ar-
chive about the cocEi that includes many of the same images
that I was able to locate over the past ten years, which will make
future research on this movement much easier.
one | SiGnS oF the tiMeS
1
Cynthia Fowler (2007, 63) offers a similar analysis of the work
of several contemporary American Indian artists who “explore
hybridity as a vehicle for the redefinition not only of themselves
as individuals, but also of their culture as a whole.”
2
On the legend of Aztlán and artwork derived from it, see Fields
and Zamudio- Taylor (2001). See especially Mesa- Bains (2001)
and Zamudio- Taylor (2001) about the relationship of Aztlán to
the Chicano movement and associated art.
3
On the student movement of 1968, see Poniatowska ([1971]
1992); Zermeño ([1978] 1998); Álvarez Garín (1998); Frazier
and Cohen (2003); and Carey (2005). On the artwork of the
student movement of 1968, see Grupo Mira (1988); Ayala
(1998); Aquino and Perezvega (2004); and Vázquez Mantecón
(2006b). On the grupos movement, see El Rollo et al. (1980);
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