Contributors
vincanne adams is director of the Medical Anthropology Program at the
University of California, San Francisco (joint program with University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley) and a professor of medical anthropology. She is the author of three
books and numerous articles on medical anthropology, women’s health, and the
politics of modernity in Inner Asia.
nancy n. chen is professor of anthropology at the University of California,
Santa Cruz (on leave from Scripps College). A medical anthropologist, she is
author of Food, Medicine, and the Quest for Good Health (2009) and Breathing
Spaces: Qigong, Psychiatry, and Healing in China (2003), and coeditor of China
Urban: Ethnographies of Contemporary Culture (2001) and Bodies in the Making:
Transgression and Transformation (2006).
stefan ecks is codirector of the Anthropology of Health and Illness Program
and a senior lecturer in social anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. Ecks
has conducted fieldwork in South Asia since 1999. His current work looks at
emerging forms of pharmaceutical uses, evidence-based medicine, and global
corporate citizenship. He recently completed a collaborative project that traced
how three key pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, oxytocin, rifampicin) are regulated,
produced, distributed, and prescribed in India and Nepal.
kathleen erwin is director of the Research Program Application and Review
Center at the University of California Office of the President. She received her
Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, and completed
a postdoc in aids prevention studies at ucsf. Dr. Erwin first lived in Shanghai in
1984, and has conducted research in China since 1993 on topics ranging from
gender and sexual culture to her more recent work on blood donation and hiv.
phuoc v. le has a master’s of public health degree from the University of
California, Berkeley, and a medical degree from Stanford. He is currently a resi-
dent in the Harvard Affiliated Residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, and
a Global Health Equity resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston,
Massachusetts.
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