noTes

inTroduCTion
1
See Desmond, ed., Meaning in Motion; McCarren, Dancing Machines.
Books on dance published since 1995 include Burt, Alien Bodies;
Franko, The Work of Dance; Koritz, Gendering Bodies / Performing
Art; Lepecki, ed., Of the Presence of the Body; Tomko, Dancing Class.
Recent books of theater history include George, The Royalty of Negro
Vaudeville; Krasner, A Beautiful Pageant; Elam and Krasner, Afri-
can American Performance and Theater History. Work on theories of
the body includes Brooks, “‘The Deeds Done in My Body,’” and her
Bodies in Dissent; Gatens, Imaginary Bodies; Grosz, Volatile Bodies.
2
Here I am referring to Lott, Love and Theft; Lhamon, Raising Cain;
Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness.
3
Nenno, “Femininity, the Primitive and Modern Urban Space,” 149.
4
Phelan, Unmarked.
5
Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, 59–144.
6
De Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life, 37.
7
Carlson, Performance, 173.
8
Brody, Impossible Purities, 53.
9
Lhamon, Raising Cain, 15.
10
Unidentified clipping, n.p., Williams and Walker file, Locke Collec-
tion, BR, LC, NYPL.
11
Clifford, Routes, 267.
12
Ibid., 7.
13
“‘Good’ travel (heroic, educational, scientific, adventurous, en-
nobling) is something men (should) do. Women are impeded from
serious travel. Some of them go distant places, but largely as compan-
ions or as ‘exceptions.’” Ibid., 6.
14
Ibid., 32.
15
Peterson, “Doers of the Word,” 98.
16
Prince, The Narrative of Nancy Prince, 1–88.
17
Seacole, Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands. For
secondary reading, see Terborg-Penn, “Free Women Entrepreneurs
from the 1820s and 1850s,” 159–75.
18
Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
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