293
I N D E X
Africans: students in Moscow, 254 n.16
Agency, 3, 22, 23, 151; historical, 168;
and irony, 226; and performance, 25,
200
Allegory, 36
All-Russian Gypsy Union, 133; dis-
solved, 172
America, 230, 231; emigration to, 91;
Roma on, 75, 255 n.33
Anti-Semitism, 74, 152, 254 n.23
Anti-Taylor, William: visit to Russia,
254 n.16
Archives, 29, 66, 124, 174, 183, 187
Archives: documenting land owner-
ship, 183; KGB, 187; oral accounts
and, 11, 182; Romani readings of,
29, 185–187; state records of kin,
10
Aristocrats: Lovara described to mask
as, 115
Aristotle, 251 n.20
Armenians, 77, 76
Art: as metonymic of Gypsies, 31–35;
and national ideologies, 31–36
Artels, 172–174, 178; arrests of leaders
of, 171, 176; Red TransBaikal, 171;
Serbo-Rumanian, 171; The Romanian
Foreigner, 170, 174
Asians: constructions of, 65
Assimilation policy, 60; and gender,
123, 214, 230, 261 n.25; Romani
Theater’s role in, 129–130; Vlax
Roma and, 137
Assimilation: and authenticity, 4, 89,
94, 159
Audiences: Russian, 1
Austin, J. L., 24
Austro-Hungarian Empire, 38
Authenticity, 6, 11–12, 13, 16, 18, 21–
30, 93–102, 108, 124–165, 150, 233;
and consumption, 115; crises of, 29,
124–129, 140, 154, 159, 203; criteria
of, 11, 15, 68, 109, 128, 145–146,
153, 159; and detail, 110; di√erence
and, 211; as hybrid, 223–224; and in-
tertextuality, 31; and language, 223,
228–229; and memory, 21, 126, 160;
and metapragmatics, 101; and ori-
gins, 87, 127, 177; race and, 69, 74;
Romani intellectuals dismissed as
lacking, 168; at Romani Theater, 140,
142, 147; and theatricality, 29, 127;
and Tsyganshchina, 106, 109, 140–
150, 143, 145, 262 n.33
Bakhtin, Mikhail, 151; on monologism,
251 n.20
Batalova, Anna-Ganga, 94
Bateson, Gregory, 23, 26
Bazaars, 13, 56–79, 200; as dangerous,
66; masking at, 188; after 1991, 66;
visual impressions at, 233; wildness
at, 28
Beash Gypsies, 9, 10, 59, 88, 118, 119,
237, 260 n.10
Beggars, 118, 247 n.2, 253 n.9
Begging: as artful resistance, 267 n.1
Berlin Wall, 43
Bessarabia: Pushkin in, 34
Betrayal, 103, 169, 186, 191–192
Bilingualism, 89, 199
Binaries, 53–57, 120, 125, 195–225,
232; and code-switching, 224; mal-
leability of, 202
Biography, 18, 166, 169; family, 184;
particulars of, 87
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