∂NOTES
Introduction
1. Callahan, ‘‘Mexican Border Troubles,’’ 109.
2. Biographical outline, Amador Family Papers, MS 4. For a discussion of the
Terrazas family see Wasserman, Capitalists, Caciques, and Revolution.
3. The Indian Appropriation Act of 1885 reorganized and clarified the rules for
investigating Indian ‘‘indemnity.’’ Claimants had to prove the value of their property;
that they had not been negligent in guarding it; and that Native Americans had
indeed taken it. Field investigations of such claims began in 1889, and Congress
granted the U.S. Court of Claims jurisdiction over these cases in 1891. See Callahan,
‘‘Mexican Border Troubles,’’ 108n28.
4. Depositions taken before Herbert B. Holt, a Commissioner of the Court of
Claims throughout the United States on the fourteenth day of May, A.D. 1898.
Amador Family Papers, MS 4, Martin Amador—Legal Documents, 1870–1920, Box
27, Folder 3.
5. Gonzáles, Mexicanos, 102.
6. Griswold del Castillo, The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 65–72.
7. Deposition of Pedro Melenudo before Herbert B. Holt, a Commissioner of the
Court of Claims throughout the United States on the fourteenth day of May, A.D.
1898. Amador Family Papers, MS 4, Martin Amador—Legal Documents, 1870–
1920, Box 27, Folder 3.
8. For another discussion of race and ‘‘bodily comportment’’ in New Mexico see
Mitchell, Coyote Nation, 5–6.
9. Deposition of Melenudo (see note 7 above).
10. Ibid.
11. Deposition of Martin Amador before Herbert B. Holt, a Commissioner of
the Court of Claims throughout the United States on the fourteenth day of May,
A.D. 1898. Amador Family Papers, MS 4, Martin Amador—Legal Documents,
1870–1920, Box 27, Folder 3.
12. Deposition of Melenudo (see note 7 above).
13. Ibid.
14. Deposition of Clemente Montoya before Herbert B. Holt, a Commissioner
of the Court of Claims throughout the United States on the fourteenth day of May,
A.D. 1898. Amador Family Papers, MS 4, Martin Amador—Legal Documents,
1870–1920, Box 27, Folder 3.
15. Ibid.
16. Ibid.
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