notes
introduction
1.
Farred, Rethinking C. L. R. James, 1.
2.
Buhle, C. L. R. James, 164.
3.
Farred, Rethinking C. L. R. James, 11.
4.
The quotes here allude to two recent works: St. Louis, Rethinking Race, Politics,
and Poetics; and Rosengarten, Urbane Revolutionary. For my brief review of both, see
Høgsbjerg, “Remembering C. L. R. James, Forgetting C. L. R. James.”
5.
Buhle, C. L. R. James, 172.
6.
Glaberman, “C. L. R. James,” 47.
7.
Fryer, Staying Power, 336.
8.
Glaberman, “C. L. R. James,” 47.
9.
Farred, Rethinking C. L. R. James, 12.
10.
Macey, Frantz Fanon, 26, 28. On Macey and Fanon, see Lazarus, The Postcolonial
Unconscious, 161–82.
11.
For more on this, see Frassinelli, “Repositioning C. L. R. James.”
12.
Nielsen, C. L. R. James, 105.
13.
St. Louis, Rethinking Race, Politics, and Poetics, 195.
14.
Farred, Rethinking C. L. R. James, 11–12.
15.
Farred, “The Maple Man,” 173–74, 181. In all fairness, one might note that Farred
subsequently detected some possible lessons in The Black Jacobins for postcolonial
Africa. Farred, “First Stop, Port- au- Prince.”
16.
Buhle, C. L. R. James, 4.
17.
Buhle, Tim Hector, 17.
18.
Dance, “Conversation with C. L. R. James” (1980), 119.
19.
Buhle, Tim Hector, 17.
20.
Buhle, “From a Biographer’s Notebook,” 451.
21.
Brennan, At Home in the World, 224.
22.
For criticism of Tessa Jowell and David Lammy on this score, see Høgsbjerg,
“C. L. R. James,” 178.
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