I N T RO D U C T I O N
Chicana Feminisms at the Crossroads:
Disruptions in Dialogue

Su cuerpo es una bocacalle [her body is an intersection].
—Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera
In her groundbreaking anthology, Making Face/Making Soul: Haciendo
Caras, Gloria Anzaldúa organized a collection of writings by women of
color that reflect what she calls ‘‘our fragmented and interrupted dialogue
which is said to be discontinued and incomplete discourse’’ and asked
readers to participate ‘‘in the making of meaning . . .to connect the dots, the
fragments’’ (1990, xvii–xviii). Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader repre-
sents our move to build on Anzaldúa’s observation that the praxis of femi-
nists of color is often not recognized or sanctioned in the academy. Specifi-
cally, we highlight the process of debate and dialogue that has always been
integral to Chicana feminist theory and practice.
At times, the debate has been highly contentious, particularly in the
struggle for a voice and space within masculinist projects, such as the Chi-
cano movement, or within predominantly white, middle-class feminist
circles.1
Teresa Córdova summarizes the nature of these struggles: ‘‘Chi-
canas write in opposition to the symbolic representations of the Chicano
movement that did not include them. Chicanas write in opposition to a
hegemonic feminist discourse that places gender as a variable separate from
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