abolitionism: black cultural self-
assertion and, 167; black vengeance
envisioned in, 63–64, 230–31 n. 99;
Cleopatra and, 183, 184–85, 205–6;
college’s commitment to, 4–5; cult
of sentiment in, 45–48; emblem of,
54, 57, 69, 73; feminism linked to,
169–71; of Garibaldi and Lincoln,
24; gender roles in, 60–61, 230
n. 94; Italian involvement in, 19–20,
220 n. 69; newspaper against, 8, 218
n. 32. See also National Anti-Slavery
Standard
abolitionists: African Americans pro-
moted by, 13, 16, 18, 37; at dedication
of sculpture, 60; expanded goals of,
3; Italian unification and, 23; Lewis
assisted by, 5, 11–18; Native Ameri-
can rights and, 99–100, 106–7
“acting out,” 161–62
Adams, John Quincy, 100
Adoration of the Magi (M. E. Lewis),
27
aesthetics and science: Cleopatra and,
183–86; reading of appearance in,
135, 136–38, 140–41, 143
aesthetics of sentiment, 77–78. See also
cultural work; sentimentalism
Africa: diaspora from, 24, 219 n. 58;
Egypt coded as black, 67–68;
identity and, 166–68, 172, 174–75;
photographic images of, 220 n. 65;
reading Lewis’s work through, 170;
standard iconography of peoples,
19
African American artists: different
identities for, 38–39; race as describ-
ing, 136–41, 143; self-hating subver-
sive narrative of, 163–64, 176, 180;
tautological interpretation of, 33–37,
150–51; white extensions of self and,
145–46
—men: challenge to stereotypes of,
148–50; discourse on, 210; father
relationships read onto, 46–47,
152–53, 162, 177, 226–27 n. 50; mar-
ginalization of, 35–37; sentimental
narrative and, 45–48
INdEx
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
Previous Page Next Page