CONTRIBUTORS
Houston A. Baker Jr. is Susan Fox and George D. Beischer Arts and Sciences Professor of
English and African and African American Studies at Duke University. He is the author and
editor of numerous books, including Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (1987); Black
Studies, Rap and the Academy (1993); and most recently, Critical Memory: Public Spheres,
African American Writing, and Black Fathers and Sons in America (2001); and Turning South
Again: Rethinking Modernism/Rereading Booker T. (Duke, 2001). As a poet, his books include
Blues Journeys Home (1985) and Passing Over (2000).
Roland Barthes (1915–1980) taught off and on for a number of years in Bayonne, Paris, Biar-
ritz, and Bucharest before he became a teaching fellow at the Centre National de Recherche
Scientifique. In 1960, he joined the faculty at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, serving as
a director of studies from 1962 until 1977, when he was elected to the chair of literary semi-
ology at the Collège de France. His many books include Writing Degree Zero (1953); Mytholo-
gies (1957); S/Z (1970); The Pleasure of the Text (1973); A Lover’s Discourse (1977); and Camera
Lucida: Reflections on Photography (1980).
Homi Bhabha is Professor of English and American Literature and Language at Harvard Uni-
versity. He is the author of The Location of Culture (1994) and the editor of Nation and Narra-
tion (1990).
R. P. Blackmur (1904–1965), poet and critic, taught in the English Department at Princeton
University from 1940 until his death. He traveled worldwide as a cultural critic and American
ambassador of the intellect under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation and from 1961
to 1962, he lectured as the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at Cambridge
University. His books include The Expense of Greatness (1940); Language as Gesture: Essays in
Poetry (1952); New Criticism in the United States (1959); Eleven Essays in the European Novel
(1964); Poems of R. P. Blackmur (1977); and Studies in Henry James (1980).
Cleanth Brooks (1906–1994) taught at Louisiana State University, University of Texas, and
University of Michigan, before he accepted a post in the English Department at Yale University,
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