Notes
INTRODUCTION
1
Jones, Multinationals and Global Capitalism; O’Rourke and Williamson, Globaliza-
tion and History; Feis, Europe; Polanyi, The Great Transformation.
2
Boyd-Barrett and Rantanen, The Globalization of News, 2.
3
Ibid.; Desbordes, ‘‘Western Empires and News Flows in the 19th Century.’’
4
Chandler, Scale and Scope.
5
Jones, Multinationals and Global Capitalism, 282.
6
Hills, The Struggle for Control of Global Communications, 179–80.
7
Hogan, Informal Entente.
8
Wilson, Submarine Telegraphic Cables in Their International Relations, 7–8.
9
nac, Fleming, rg3, vol. 627.
10
Harvey, The New Imperialism, 26.
11
Gallagher and Robinson, ‘‘The Imperialism of Free Trade,’’ 1.
12
Harvey, The New Imperialism, 26.
13
Ibid., 37.
14
Comor, The Global Political Economy of Communications, chap. 1; Cox, ‘‘Global
Perestroika,’’ 30–43.
15
Lukes, Power.
16
Harvey, New Imperialism, 29.
17
As paraphrased in Sklar, The Corporate Restructuring of American Capitalism, 81.
18
The following countries adopted constitutional governments during the time frame
of our study, some including a ‘‘bill of rights’’ modeled along liberal lines and drafted
with the aid of European legal scholars: Romania and Tunisia (1861), Egypt (1866),
Serbia in the 1860s, Persia (1906), the Ottoman Empire (1876), China (1911) as well
as several Latin American countries (circa 1890s); Findley, Bureaucratic Reform in
the Ottoman Empire; Kedourie, Politics in the Middle East; Marichal, A Century of
Debt Crisis in Latin America; Lee and Goldman, An Intellectual History of Modern
China, 13–96.
19
Rosenberg, Financial Missionaries to the World; Ninkovich, The United States and
Imperialism.
20
Kindleberger, Manias, Panics, and Crashes.
21
Ninkovich, The United States and Imperialism; Ambrosius, Wilsonianism, 24.
22
Giddings, Democracy and Empire; Reinsch, Intellectual and Political Currents in the
Far East.
23
Ignatie√, Empire Lite; Cooper, ‘‘The New Liberal Imperialism.’’
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