Abaza, Fikri, 172
‘Abbas I, 120, 124
‘Abbas II, 154
‘Abduh, Muhammad, 169
Abu al-Salt, 85
Abu al-Su‘ud, ‘Abdallah, 128–29,
133, 134
Abu Hadid, Muhammad Farid, 244
Abu Shadi, Ahmad Zaki, 215,
227, 230
Abu Simbel, Belzoni’s excavations at,
40, 41–43
Abu ‘Ubayd al-Bakri, 86
Adorno, Theodor, 3–4
aesthetic experience: Carter’s
Tutankhamen tomb discovery
as, 172–73, 181–83, 190, 225; in
European travel narratives, 33–34,
181–82; historical knowledge and
interpretation and, 92–93; juxta-
positions of ancient and modern
and, 40–41; museum going and
exhibition viewing as, 5, 198; ruins
as, 34–35, 40
aesthetic values: ambivalence of,
about Egyptian antiquities, 9, 33–
34, 46, 48, 49, 52–55, 57, 286–87 n.
72; museum development and, 47
al-Afghani, Jalal al-Din, 169
Africa Association, 31
Afrocentric Egyptology, 12–13
agency of artifacts and monuments,
4–5, 17–18, 19, 35, 70–71, 158–59,
182–83, 190
Ahmose, 256–57, 258, 259–60
‘aja’ib literature, 82–84, 293–94 n. 33
Åkerblad, Johann David, 93
Akhenaton, 146
Akhenukh, 85
alchemy, 21
allegory. See literary allegory
Allenby, Lord, 195
ambiguity and conflict: artifacts as
embodiments of, 29, 60; civilization
as dialectic and, 130–31; Egyptian
adoption of Egyptology and, 116;
in Egyptology, 11, 14–16, 18–19,
225–26; within Pharaonism, 14–15,
273–75
Amin, Ahmad, 308 n. 57
‘Anan, Salah, 228, 230
ancient-modern opposition, 15,
68–69, 101, 108; European views
of, 40–41; in Roberts’s lithographs,
104–8
al-Antiqakhana: first, 117, 118–20,
124; second, 126–29, 135, 154
antiquarianism: Egyptology vs., 8–9,
75–76. See also European antiquar-
ianism, Egyptology
Index
Note: page numbers in italics indicate illustrations and captions
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