NOTES
Introduction
Mary Cooper,
The Diary of Mary Cooper: Life on a Long Island Farm
1768-1773,
ed. Field Horne (Oyster Bay, N.Y., 1981), 13, 19,23-24.
2 This view is taken in, for example, John C. Miller, "Religion, Finance and
Democracy in Massachusetts,"
New England Quarterly
6 (1933): 29-58; Gary B.
Nash,
The Urban Crucible: Social Change, Political Consciousness, and
the
Origins
of the American Revolution
(Cambridge, Mass., 1979), 161-263; and Elizabeth 1.
Nybakken, "New Light on the Old Side: Irish Influences on Colonial Presbyte-
rianism,"
Journal of American History
68 (1981-82): 813-32.
3 Itinerancy, of course, was an old problem whose history is discussed in chap-
ter 1 below. Yet historians of the Awakening from Joseph Tracy forward have
recognized that it took on new prominence in controversial literature of the
Awakening after 1740. See, for example, Joseph Tracy,
The Great Awakening:
A History of
the
Revival of Religion in the Time of Edwards and Whitefield
(Bos-
ton, 1845), 75-119, 230-54; Alan Heimert,
Religion and the American Mind:
From
the
Great Awakening to
the
Revolution
(Cambridge, Mass., 1966), 36, 118-22,
161-64, and passim; Alan Heimert and Perry Miller, eds.,
The Great Awaken-
ing: Documents Illustrating the Crisis and Its Consequences
(Indianapolis and New
York, 1967), 147-51,228-364 passim; Richard
L.
Bushman,
The Great Awaken-
ing: Documents on the Revival of Religion,
1740-1745 (New York, 1970), 19-65;
Harry S. Stout, "Religion, Communication, and the Ideological Origins of the
American Revolution,"
William and Mary Quarterly,
3d ser., 34 (1977): 519-41.
4 Bushman,
The Great Awakening,
58-60.
5 See, for example, Charles Chauncy,
Enthusiasm describ'd and caution'd against
(Boston, 1742), ii-iv.
6 Jon Butler has argued that these sporadic outbreaks were largely unrelated; see
his "Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretive
Fiction,"
The Journal of American History
69 (1982-83): 305-25; and his
Awash
in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing
the
American People
(Cambridge, Mass., 1990),
164-93. I will argue in contrast that after 1739, colonists themselves perceived
revivals throughout the colonies to
be
integrally related as they read about dis-
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