A Selected and Annotated Bibliography of
Contemporary Chicano Literary Criticism
The following works were selected by the editors with the assistance of Roberto
Trujillo, curator of Mexican American Collections for Stanford University Libraries.
They represent a comprehensive search and review of Chicano materials through Decem-
ber
1990
based on the
MLA
Bibliography and the Research Libraries Information Network
databases, various reference guides including Ernestina N. Eger's A Bibliography of Con-
temporary Chicano Literature, Trujillo and Rodriguez's Literatura Chicana: Creative
and Critical Writings Through
1984,
Julio A. Martinez and Francisco Lomeli's Chicano
Literature: A Reference Guide, Julio A. Martinez's Chicano Scholars and Writers: A Bio-
Bibliographical Directory, and volumes of the Chicano Periodical Index. Ultimately, the
criteria for selection, which were to offer to the widest interested audience a basic
knowledge of the field of Chicano literary criticism, rested with the editors. Thus we
chose works of different critical tendencies on literary history and theory, on literary and
performance genres, as well as important collections, bibliographies, and reference
guides.
Alarcon, Norma. "Chicanas' Feminist Literature: A Re-Vision Through Malinntzin/or
Malintzin: Putting Flesh Back on the Object." In This Bridge Called My Back:
Writings by Radical Women of Color, ed. Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua,
182-
90.
New York: Kitchen Table/Women of Color Press,
1983.
An essay examining the traditional image of Malintzin in Chicano culture and its
recuperation by Chicana writers.
---a
"Making Familia From Scratch: Split Subjectivities in the Work of Helena Maria
Viramontes and Cherrie Moraga." In Chicana Creativity and Criticism: Charting
New Frontiers in American Literature, ed. Maria Herrera-Sobek and Helena Maria
Viramontes,
147-59.
Houston: Arte Publico Press,
1988.
Alarcon explores the refusal to speak as woman (wife/mother) and the crisis of
meaning that this position engenders for two Chicana writers.
---a
"Traddutura, Traditora:
A
Paradigmatic Figure of Chicana Feminism." The Con-
struction of Gender and Modes of Social Division, ed. Donna Przybylowicz, Nancy
Hartsock, and Pamela McCallum. Special issue of Cultural Critique, no.
13
(Fall
1989):57-87.
An overview of the Malinche figure drawn from both Mexican and Chicana creative
and critical traditions.
---a
"What Kind of Lover Have You Made Me Mother?: Towards a Theory of Chicana's
Feminism and Cultural Identity Through Poetry." In Women of Color: Perspectives
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