CLOSING: A PLURINATIONAL S
mo·sa·ic, noun. Biology: an organism or one of its parts
composed of cells of more than one genotype.
mo·sa·i·cism, noun (1926). Genetics: the condition of posses-
sing cells of two or more different genetic constitutions.
—Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2000
the equatorial sun shone brightly as Clara ran out to gr
fromthecolumnofmarchersspanningonesideofthePan-Am
Highway. It was early October 1997. The women of Pastaza w
ready on the twelfth day of their journey from Puyo to Quito
time I met them in the central Andes.Two hundred strong, the
chihuarmiguna, or powerful women (as theycalled themselve
embarked on the second opip-affiliated march to the nation’s
that decade. Carrying children and protest placards, grandmo
mothers, sisters, and daughters once more reversed the exped
of sixteenth-century conquistadores and walked from their A
nian homelands to the seat of political power. They sought
nounce exclusionary state rule and intensified petroleum acti
Pastaza. Clara’s mother was one of four women holding th
banner that headed their procession. Framed by the imag
woman whose limbs transformed into the roots and the branc
a tree, the banner read: ‘‘Pachamama: A March for Life, the
and Respect for the Cultural Integrity of Indigenous Peoples.
the Petroleros.’’
Yet the political process in which these sinchi huarmiguna
ultimately participate encompassed and went beyond wha
protest banner suggested. Their procession served as a ca
generating popular protest throughout the country. Indee
g
2004.3.17
07:22
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Sawyer
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CRUDE
CHRONICLES
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