N OTEs
Notes to Introduction
1. Segato, “La escritura en el cuerpo de las mujeres asesinadas en Cd. Juárez,”
98. Unless otherwise indicated, all translations from sources in Spanish are
my own.
2. Freud, “Timely Reflections on War and Death,” in On Murder, Mourning
and Melancholia, 170.
3. Freud, “Why War?,” in On Murder, Mourning and Melancholia, 221–22.
4. Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, 81.
5. Derrida, “Psychoanalysis Searches the States of the Soul: The Impossible
Beyond of a Sovereign Cruelty,” in Without Alibi, 262–63.
6. Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, 459.
7. Agamben, Homo Sacer, 171.
8. Mbembe, “Necropolitics,” 11–40.
9. Mbembe, “Necropolitics,” 26–27.
10. Dussel, The Invention of the Americas, 12.
11. Dussel, The Invention of the Americas, 48.
12. Taussig, Shamanism, Colonialism and the Wild Man, 28.
13. De las Casas, A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, 70.
14. Guatemala, Comisión de Esclarecimiento Histórico (ceh), Guatemala:
Memoria del Silencio, 1:16–17.
15. For more on developmentalism, see Escobar, Encountering Development.
16. Timerman, Prisoner without a Name, 39.
17. Timerman, Prisoner without a Name, 39–40.
18. Foucault, “Society Must Be Defended,” 257.
19. On the indigenous rebellions in the Andes, see Flores Galindo, Buscando
un Inca.
20. Sarmiento, Facundo, 45–46.
21. In a short autobiographical essay first given as a speech and then published
as a preface to Obras completas, Neruda comments that “after 1820 (the In-
dependence), the Chileans dedicated themselves to killing Indians with
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