I n d e x
abduction, 143–45, 148, 150, 157, 231, 305,
327 n. 25, 328 n. 42
actuarial status, 215, 225, 296, 328 n. 1
advertisement, 170, 293–96, 304, 332 n. 43
aesthetics: broadly-defined, 10, 310 n. 22;
classification and, 328 n. 42; cultural
potency of medical images and, 12; cut-
ting and, 41, 301; of detection, 142–43,
157, 340 n. 45; grids and, 37–38, 303, 316
n. 60; of juxtaposition, 221, 292, 301,
303; museums and, 165, 296, 327 n. 33;
nonradiological images and, 167, 313
n. 23, 314 nn. 37–38, 317 n. 81; in radio­
logical work, 30, 33, 48–49, 72, 91,
148–49, 179; urban crowds and, 131
affects: in case conferences, 142–43; in
diagnostic intrigues, 273, 304; at the
museum of pathology, 278, 280, 282; in
viewing images, 134, 304
afip
(Armed Forces Institute of Pathol-
ogy): history of, 342 n. 22; hybrid
missions of, 11, 278, 287, 296–97, 341
n. 8; pathologic tissue archives of, 280,
285; rad-path archives of, 270, 276, 282,
285, 287, 341 n. 28; as sponsor of course
in radiologic pathology, 275–76; visits
to, 278, 282
age of patients, 140, 215, 218, 225, 260
alienation, 129, 132, 149–50, 167–68, 331
n. 29, 332 n. 31
ambiguity, 19, 27, 31, 35, 208, 219, 244, 290,
299
analysis: of cases, through early account-
ing methods, 193; in detection, 130–31,
142–43, 199, 340 n. 45; of gesture, by the
camera, 22; of medical decisions, 197,
334 nn. 65–66; performance of, 134, 143;
of the radiological gaze, 22; as repre-
sentational mode, 305; as skill, elided
in technology assessment, 290; by the
tomographic apparatus, 95, 321 n. 11
anthropology, 8, 147, 152, 288, 294, 309
n. 16
anthropometry, 152, 161, 164, 278, 280,
332 n. 39, 338 n. 28, 341 n. 15. See also
craniology
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