CONTRIBUTORS
GEORGE E. BISHARAT
is a Professor of Law at Hastings College of the Law in San
Francisco. He teaches in the areas of criminal practice and procedure, law and
social anthropology, and law in Middle East societies. His study of the impact of
Israeli occupation on the Palestinian legal profession of the West Bank is titled
Palestinian Lawyers and Israeli Rule: Law and Disorder in the West Bank. Currently he is
conducting research on the role of right-wing legal foundations in the United
States, as part of an international and interdisciplinary study project on lawyers
who work for social and political causes.
JOHN BORNEMAN
is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Cornell University,
Ithaca, New York. He has published widely on German identities, including After the
Wall: East Meets West in the New Berlin and Belonging in the Two Berlins, and has two
forthcoming books: Settling Accounts:Justice, Violence, and Accountability in Postsocialist
States and Subversions of International Order: Studies in the Political Anthropology of
Culture. His current project is about the death of the great dictators/ father figures
of this century.
ROSEMARY J. COOMBE
teaches at the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto.
She is the author of the forthcoming book Cultural Appropriations: Authorship, Al-
terity, and the Law. Recent articles on the politics of intellectual property have
appeared in Cultural Anthropology, Social Text, Public Culture, and the Yale Journal of
Law and Humanities. A review of the potential for "a critical studies of law" is
forthcoming in Law in the Domains of Culture, ed. Sarat and Kearns. She serves on
the Board of Directors of the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology.
MARY M. CRAIN
is Visiting Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Latin
American History at the University of Barcelona, Spain. She has carried out field-
work in Spain (Catalonia and Andalusia) as well as in highland Ecuador and has
written extensively on rituals, politics, the media, and social identities. She is co-
author, with Cristina Garda Rodero, of Espana Oculta: Public Celebrations in Spain,
1974-1989 and author of "The Gendering of Ethnicity in the Ecuadorian Andes:
Native Womens' Self-Fashioning in the Urban Marketplace," in Machos, Mistresses,
and Madonnas: Contesting the Power of Latin American Gender Imagery, ed. Marit Mel-
huus and Kristi Anne Stolen.
JAMES FERGUSON
is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at
the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of The Anti-Politics Machine: ''De-
Previous Page Next Page