Notes
Introduction
1
Quoted in Whitfield, The Culture of the Cold War, 142.
2
Reagan’s complete huac testimony is reprinted in Bent-
ley, Thirty Years of Treason, 143–47; the quotation here
occurs on 146–47. For every unfriendly witness who was
asked if he or she had ever been a member of the Commu-
nist Party, a friendly witness was asked if such membership
should be outlawed.
3
See especially Navasky, Naming Names; and Ceplair and
Englund, The Inquisition in Hollywood. For an excellent
overview of the year 1947 in film that emphasizes the anxi-
eties both embodied and engendered by huac, see Wil-
liams, ‘‘1947.’’
4
J. Edgar Hoover, huac testimony, March 26, 1947, quoted
in Schrecker, The Age of McCarthyism, 127–33.
5
The term fifth column was introduced in a Spanish radio
address in 1936 by Emilo Mola, a rebel (pro-Franco) gen-
eral who called for a fifth column of support in Madrid to
aid his four military columns laying siege to the city from
without. The fifth-column betrayal of Spanish loyalists by a
high-ranking rebel infiltrator plays a central part in the first
Hollywood narrative made about the Spanish Civil War,
Blockade (1938), with a rather muddled screenplay by John
Howard Lawson.
6
For attempting to fuse politics with affect, two pioneering
cultural studies of the period deserve special mention,
although my emphasis on the uncanny aspects of citizen-
ship differs from theirs: Polan, Power and Paranoia; and
Graebner, The Age of Doubt. Both studies are noteworthy
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