Introduction.Worlding Psychoanalysis
In ‘‘Geopsychoanalysis,’’ Jacques Derrida comments on the blindness of
psychoanalysistomostoftheearth,andofwhatitinscribesontheearth
through‘‘itsongoingworldification,’’thatis,atextualization,andthevio-
lent event of imposing a way of being in the
world.1
His project is to
criticize polemically the politics of the International Psychoanalytic As-
sociation, and the treatment of what is dismissed by it as ‘‘the rest of the
world,’’ in which ‘‘Homo psychoanalyticus is unknown or outlawed.’’
2
The
ipa was established in 1913, although its conception took place nearly a
decade earlier. Psychoanalytic institutes developed internationally, some
with the blessings of the ipa, some more independently. The majority,
predictably, was in Europe and the United States, a minority in Central
andSouthAmerica,butveryfewinstituteswereestablishedin‘‘therestof
the world’’—in Africa, Asia, and Australia. Since its inception, the asso-
ciationhasclaimedanonpoliticalagenda.Todaythisclaimisinevidence,
forexample, in the statements by the ipa on the U.N. World Conference
against Racism, and on the terrorist attacks on the United States, both
inSeptember2001.Concernedabouttheaccusationofanti-Semitismin
the reporting of the conference in the United States, and mindful of the
necessityofmakingapsychoanalyticresponsetotheattacksontheWorld
TradeCenterandthePentagon,thepresidentofthe ipa,ProfessorDaniel
Widlöcher, issued the following statement:
The purpose [of attending the U.N. conference] is to consider, ad-
vise,andpromotecontributionsthattheprofessionofpsychoanaly-
Previous Page Next Page