Florencia e. mallon
Conclusion
When​Noenoe​Silva​and​Stéfano​Varese​attempted,​at​the​close​of​our​con-
ference​in​Madison,​to​summarize​our​discussions​as​a​frame​for​our​last​
plenary​session,​they​highlighted​both​the​promises​and​the​difficulties​in​
taking​the​kind​of​international​and​comparative​perspective​we​have​at-
tempted​in​this​book.​In​this​brief​conclusion​I​revisit​some​of​the​general​
themes​and​challenges​associated​with​such​a​perspective.​I​cannot​presume​
to​represent​here​the​richness​of​the​perceptions​and​conclusions​contained​
in​each​essay.​Instead,​I​highlight​three​general​points​that​emerge​from​the​
overall​conversation,​reiterating​the​desire—present​in​the​work​of​all​the​
contributors​to​this​book​as​well​as​of​all​those​present​at​the​conference—
that​we​can​contribute​in​some​way​to​a​deeper​and​more​productive​dia-
logue​among​Native​peoples​and​between​Native​and​other​forms​of​knowl-
edge.
At​the​core​of​the​project​envisioned​by​the​authors​represented​in​this​
book​is​the​understanding​of​Native​histories​and​narratives​in​international​
and​comparative​context.​As​the​recent​history​of​indigenous​movements​
has​demonstrated,​international​collaboration​has​fostered​new​possibilities​
for​indigenous​mobilization​and​empowerment.​At​the​same​time,​the​pro-
cess​of​examining​Native​histories​and​narratives​in​comparative​and​inter-
national​perspective​extends​and​deepens​our​understanding​of​each​one.​
Both​the​similarities​and​the​differences​we​find​among​them​sharpen​our​
appreciation​of​how,​and​for​what​purpose,​these​narratives​are​elaborated​
and​constructed.​Finally,​our​comparisons​of​North​and​South​America​as​
well​as​of​the​continental​Americas​with​the​Pacific​world​help​remind​us​
how​deeply​geography​itself,​and​through​it​the​relationships​among​distinct​
indigenous​peoples​and​traditions,​has​been​affected​by​colonialism.
A​second​theme​that​arises​from​the​essays​collected​here​is​that​decolo-
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