contributors
riet
Delsing​is​an​independent​researcher.​She​received​her​Ph.D.​in​anthropology​
from​the​University​of​California​at​Santa​Cruz​in​2009.​She​conducts​research​in​the​
history​and​place​of​Rapa​Nui​in​the​narratives​of​the​Chilean​nation-​state.
eDgar arturo esquit
cHoy​is​a​Kaqchikel​Maya​historian​and​researcher​at​the​In-
stituto​de​Estudios​Interétnicos​in​Guatemala.​He​is​the​author​of​Otros Poderes, Nue-
vos Desafíos: Relaciones Interétnicas en Tecpan y Su Entorno Departamental, 1871–1935​
(2002)​and​the​coauthor,​with​Víctor​Gálvez​Borrell,​of​The Mayan Movement Today:
Issues of Indigenous Culture and Development in Guatemala​(1997).
FernanDo garcés
v.​ received​ his​ M.A.​ in​ social​ sciences​ from​ Flacso-​Quito​
(Ecuador)​and​is​currently​a​Ph.D.​candidate​in​Latin​American​cultural​studies​at​
the​Universidad​Andina​Simón​Bolívar​(Quito).​In​addition​to​working​in​bilingual​
and​intercultural​education​in​both​Ecuador​and​Bolivia,​he​coordinates​the​edu-
cational​program​at​the​Centro​de​Comunicación​y​Desarrollo​Andino​in​Cocha-
bamba,​Bolivia,​where​he​has​also​worked​with​the​bilingual​newspaper​Conosur
Ñawpagman.​He​has​published​several​articles​on​Quichua​and​Quechua​linguis-
tics​and​sociolinguistics​and​on​the​relationship​between​writing​and​orality​in​
Quechua.
J. keHaulani
kauanui​is​an​associate​professor​of​anthropology​and​American​
studies​at​Wesleyan​University.​Her​first​book,​Hawaiian Blood: Colonialism and the
Politics of Sovereignty and Indigeneity,​was​published​in​the​Narrating​Native​Histo-
ries​series​by​Duke​University​Press​in​2008.​In​2008​she​helped​found​the​Native​
American​and​Indigenous​Studies​Association​and​was​elected​to​its​council​the​same​
year.​In​addition​to​coediting​three​special​issues​of​journals​and​publishing​widely​
in​professional​journals,​she​is​working​on​two​new​book​projects,​one​on​gender,​
sexual​politics,​and​indigeneity​in​Hawaiian​identities​and​the​other​on​Hawaii​and​
New​Eng​land​colonialism.
brian
kloPotek​is​an​associate​professor​of​ethnic​studies​at​the​University​of​Ore-
gon.​He​is​the​author​of​Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal
Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities,​in​the​Narrating​Native​
Histories​(Duke​University​Press,​2011).​He​has​also​published​an​article​on​Indian​
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