about tHe series
Narrating​Native​Histories​aims​to​foster​a​rethinking​of​the​ethical,​method-
ological,​and​conceptual​frameworks​within​which​we​locate​our​work​on​Native​
histories​and​cultures.​We​seek​to​create​a​space​for​effective​and​ongoing​con-
versations​between​North​and​South,​Natives​and​non-​Natives,​academics​and​
activists,​throughout​the​Americas​and​the​Pacific​region.​We​are​committed​to​
complicating​and​transgressing​the​disciplinary​and​epistemological​boundaries​
of​established​academic​discourses​on​Native​peoples.
This​ series​ encourages​ symmetrical,​ horizontal,​ collaborative,​ and​ auto-​
ethnographies;​work​that​recognizes​Native​intellectuals,​cultural​interpreters,​
and​alternative​knowledge​producers​within​broader​academic​and​intellectual​
worlds;​projects​that​decolonize​the​relationship​between​orality​and​textuality;​
narratives​that​productively​work​the​tensions​between​the​norms​of​Native​cul-
tures​and​the​requirements​for​evidence​in​academic​circles;​and​analyses​that​
contribute​to​an​understanding​of​Native​peoples’​relationships​with​nation-​
states,​including​histories​of​expropriation​and​exclusion​as​well​as​projects​for​
autonomy​and​sovereignty.
Decolonizing Native Histories​represents​an​innovative​effort​to​motivate​dia-
logue​between​scholars​living​in​the​North​and​South,​academics​and​nonaca-
demic​activist​intellectuals,​indigenous​and​nonindigenous​researchers,​and​the​
different​but​overlapping​forms​of​knowledge​that​arise​out​of​these​subject​posi-
tions.​Bringing​together​research​on​Native​Latin​America,​North​America,​and​
the​Pacific,​this​book​enquires​into​a​series​of​pressing​issues:​How​do​debates​
over​Native​sovereignty​vary​over​the​three​regions?​What​does​it​mean​to​be​an​
indigenous​researcher,​and​how​might​nonindigenous​scholars​most​effectively​
collaborate​with​their​Native​counterparts?​How​should​scholars—whether​Na-
tive​or​non-​Native—who​are​committed​to​Native​struggles​ask​hard​questions​
of​activists?​What​routes​must​we​take​to​decolonize​scholarship​in​the​twenty-​
first​century?​The​answers,​which​range​from​examinations​of​Native​status​in​
Hawai‘i​and​Easter​Island,​to​evaluations​of​collaborative​research​and​writing​
techniques​in​Latin​America,​and​to​approaches​to​race​as​a​critical​component​
of​nativeness​in​North​America,​all​contribute​to​the​dialogue​we​will​need​to​
decolonize​our​scholarship​in​the​new​millennium.
Previous Page Next Page