INDEX
activism: activists, 144, 156; civil
rights, II, 31, 49; colonias, 133;
community empowerment, 38;
environmental justice, 48; grass-
roots level, 6, 77, 143; indigenous
women leaders, 6, 142-43; pro-
tests, 31, 49. See also coalition-
building; collective action; envi-
ronmental justice movement
automobile pollution, 68; citing,
46,49, 50, 63, 67, 93; in Tucson,
83
Bureau ofIndian Affairs, III-I2
coalition-building: minority and
mainstream environmental
groups, 12. See also activism; en-
vironmental justice movement
collective action, 20; counter-
mobilization, 29
colonias, 5, 7, 125-33; and city gov-
ernment, 130-34; living condi-
tions, 128-29; poverty rates, 129;
water, 130-34
Commission for Racial Justice of
the United Church of Christ, I,
25
"consumer society," 174, 191, 212-
13; materialism, 213; progress, 213
"context," 196, 210
critical thinking, 7
"cues," 166
cultural: determination, 5, 88; diver-
sity, 82; insensitivity theory, 74
(see environmental justice move-
ment); lack of sensitivity, 75, 86,
96, II5-19; lifestyles of Nativ
Americans, III - 17; strategic r
sources, 34; values, 5. See also
cluded groups
Darwinism, 200
democracy: participatory,
I.
See
government; states; excluded
groups; politics
distribution of resources, 102, 10
II8, 130; water on Native Am
can reservations, IIO-II. See a
environmental justice move-
ment, groups; excluded grou
early environmental movement,
141; mainstream groups, II-13
96
elite theory, 16-17
environment: and claims, 6; con
temporary politics, 4; degrada
tion,J5; discrimination, 35, 93
hazards,4,I2,25,4I,43,63,65
66,143; inequity, 47; interest
groups, 6; lawsuits, 96-97; N
tive American perspective, 101
215; polluters, 6; problems, 2,
88; protection, 13 (see Environ
mental Protection Agency); re
source depletion and pollutio
environmental ethics, 210, 212,
anthropocentric view, 220
environmental injustice, 2, 6, 13
46,63,74-75,142,179; defin
3. See also environmental just
movement; excluded groups;
workers
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