notes
Introduction
1
I thank Michael Dutton for directing my attention to the racially ambiguous
representation of the Chinese at Potsdam.
2
Bengal Police, from Henry, Criminal Identification by Means of Anthropometry, 1.
3
Ibid., 61–62.
4
Ibid., 61.
5
Florescano, Memory, Myth, and Time in Mexico, esp. 65–99; Mignolo, The Darker
Side of the Renaissance.
6
Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions; Hacking, “Language, Truth and
Reason,” and, “Making Up People,” 222–36; Davidson, The Emergence of Sexual-
ity, 93–124.
7
Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 2.
8
Foucault, quoted in Davidson, The Emergence of Sexuality, 201.
9
Ibid., 129.
10
Ibid., 67, 141.
11
McClintock, Imperial Leather.
12
Stoler, Race and the Education of Desire.
13
Florescano, Memory, Myth, and Time in Mexico, 65–99.
14
On “culture,” see, e.g., Young, Colonial Desire, esp. 53–54; Dirks, “Introduction:
Colonialism and Culture,” and, Colonialism and Culture, 1–26; Rosaldo, Culture
and Truth. For discussion of the colonial lineage of “tradition,” see, e.g., Mani,
“Contentious Traditions”; Chakrabarty, “Afterword.”
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