EPILOGUE
t
Victoria’sAboriginalreserveswerepredicatedonanotionofdifferencebe-
tween black and white, and the camera was deployed in white attempts
toefface,chart,orexaggeratethisdivide.Despiteinvasionanddisposses-
sion, places like Coranderrk became refuges for the survivors, and its re-
markable historyof political struggle has implications forour interpreta-
tionoftheverylargenumberof imagesofthestationproducedduringits
operation—themostsubstantialbodyofnineteenth-andearly-twentieth-
centuryphotographsfromanAustraliansite.TheAboriginalreservescon-
stitutedplacesofcross-culturalexchange,butwhiteperceptionsofculture
and placewere brought into sharp focus through the lens of the camera,
inrepresentationsthatbecameincreasinglystereotypicalduringthenine-
teenthcentury.
An ideal of the Aboriginal stations established during the early 1860s
inVictoriawasapanopticalapparatuscharacterizedbytheinculcationof
workdisciplineandself-mastery,embodiedinanorderedphysicalenviron-
mentandmonitoredthroughitsappearanceandtheinmates’demeanor.
Withinthisschema,photographycouldactasatoolofsurveillance,are-
finedformoftheimpulsetoknowandcontrol.YettheCoranderrkcom-
munity’s collaborative and consensual origins enabled the persistence of
traditional social forms, as well as the adoption of new customs ranging
from Christianityand expressions of political protest to literacyand pho-
tography.Inthecomplexintersectionofthesetwovisualregimes,wecan
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