o Essay
on Selected Sources
What follows is a discussion of selected sources. A complete listing of
sources with full citations is presented in the notes. Statistical information
can be found in several regular U.S. Government publications. The U.S.
Bureau of the Census provides essential data in the Statistical Abstract of the
United States, the Census of Manufactures, and the Current Population Reports.
Consult also the regular Bulletins of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,
and the Bureau's monthly journal, Monthly Labor Review. Especially useful
is the 1947 Bureau of Labor Statistics report on labor in the South. See
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bulletin No. 898. Private economic studies also
provide a treasure trove of information on the southern economy. First
among these is Howard W. Odum's magnum opus, Southern Regions of the
United States. See also the works of Odum's student Rupert Vance, espe-
cially his All These People; and Economic Resources and Policies of the South, a
1951 study by Calvin B. Hoover and B. U. Ratchford.
I.
u.s.
GOVERNMENT ARCHIVES AND PUBLICATIONS
The records of most U.S. government agencies are housed in the National
Archives (NA) in Washington, D.C. The records of the Department of
Labor (RG 174), the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion (RG
250), and the War Production Board (RG 179) are all available there. The
index for the Labor Department archives, an unwieldly color-coded file of
index cards that bedevils colorblind researchers, resides across town in the
library of the Department of Labor, in the Frances Perkins Building. An
especially rich source for students of the southern economy, of federal
policy, and of all American industry in the late 1930s, is RG 155, the Rec-
ords of the Wages and Hours and Public Contracts Division of the Depart-
ment of Labor. Entry 16, the records of the Industry Committees estab-
lished by the Fair Labor Standards Act, contains abundant material on the
organization of American industry on the eve of World War II.
Two important collections, the Records of the National Recovery
Administration (RG 9), and the Records of the National War Labor Board
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