contributors
Tomás Almaguer is a professor of ethnic studies at San Francisco State University.
He is the author of Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California.
Luz Calvo is an associate professor of ethnic studies at California State University,
East Bay. She is author of essays on Chicana feminism and visual culture in journals
and collections, including Meridians and Beyond the Frame: Women of Color and Visual Rep-
resentation.
Lionel Cantú (1965–2002) was an assistant professor of sociology at the University
of California, Santa Cruz. Posthumous publications include The Sexuality of Migration:
Border Crossings and Mexican Immigrant Men, edited by Nancy Naples and Salvador Vidal-
Ortiz, and a collection edited with Eithne Luibheid, Queer Migrations: Sexuality, U.S. Citi-
zenship, and Border Crossings.
Daniel Contreras is an assistant professor of Eng lish at Fordham University. He is the
author of Unrequited Love and Gay Latino Culture: What Have You Done to My Heart?
Catriona Rueda Esquibel is an associate professor of race and resistance studies at
San Francisco State University. She is the author of With Her Machete in Her Hand: Read-
ing Chicana Lesbians.
Ramón García is an associate professor of Chicana and Chicano studies at California
State University, Northridge. He has published essays on literary, visual, and cultural
studies in collections such as The Chicana/o Cultural Studies Reader and poetry and fiction
in journals, including Story and Los Angeles Review.
Ramón A. Gutiérrez is the Preston and Sterling Morton Distinguished Service Profes-
sor in United States History at the University of Chicago. He is the author of When Jesus
Came the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500–1846
and the editor of Mexican Home Altars. He is the co- editor of several books, including
Contested Eden: California before the Gold Rush, Festivals and Celebrations in American Ethnic Com-
munities, and Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage.
Michael Hames- García is a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Oregon.
He is the author of Fugitive Thought: Prison Movements, Race, and the Meaning of Justice and
Identity Complex: Making the Case for Multiplicity and coeditor of Reclaiming Identity: Realist
Theory and the Predicament of Postmodernism and Identity Politics Reconsidered.
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