Notes
INTRODUCTION
1
Itisnoteworthythattheterm‘‘Africa’’commonlyappearedinthe
titlesofanthropologicalworksincolonialdays—forexample, African
Political Systems, Seven Tribes of British Central Africa, Schism and Con-
tinuity in an African Society.Today, anthropology titles typically use
nationalandregionaldescriptorswhilepoliticalscientistsandjournal-
ists speak of ‘‘Africa.’’
2
Politicalscientistshavenotbeensoshy.Recentyearshaveseena
small boom in the publication of books about the ‘‘crisis in Africa.’’
3
Ontheimportanceofconceptionsofregionsintheworkingsof
finance, see Leyshon and Thrift 1996.
4
Forarecentaccountofsomeofthe(verydifferent)waysthatthe
category ‘‘Asia’’ is put to use, see Ching 2001. Fora discussion of the
historyof continental categorization, see Lewis and Wigen 1997.
5
Thereisverysignificantvariationwithin‘‘Africa,’’ofcourse,and
notallAfricancountriesaredoingsobadlyin‘‘developmental’’terms
asthismightimply.BotswanainparticularisoftencitedasanAfrican
‘‘success story’’ to rebut the claims of so-called Afro-pessimists. The
situation in Botswana is indeed far better than that in most of its re-
gionalneighbors,butitshouldbekeptinmindthatBotswana’sdevel-
opmentsuccessisdecidedlyrelative.AccordingtotheUnitedNations
DevelopmentProgram(undp 2004:148),mostBatswanaliveonless
than $2 perday, and its ‘‘human poverty’’ rank,while at the high end
of the Sub-Saharan African range, is still below such iconically poor
non-African countries as Bangladesh and Haiti.
6
OnAfrica’smarginalizationintheglobaleconomy,seealsoAde-
deji 1993: 1–13; Castells 2000; Hoogvelt 1997, 2002; undp 2004.
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