CONTRIBUTORS
ROBERT ADAMS JR.
is the associate director of the Institute of African American Re-
search at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. An anthropologist by train-
ing, he is currently completing a book on Dominican Vodú. His research interests
include the African Diaspora, Afro-Caribbean religions, critical race theory, educa-
tion policy, poetics, and social theory. He has conducted field research in Brazil, the
Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and South Africa.
LEE D. BAKER
is an associate professor of cultural anthropology and African and
African American Studies at Duke University. He is the author of From Savage to
Negro: Anthropology and the Construction of Race, 1896–1954 and editor of Life in
America: Identity and Everyday Experience. He has recently completed a manuscript
entitled Performers, Reformers, and Racists: Anthropology and the Racial Politics of
Culture.
JACQUELINE NASSY BROWN
is an assistant professor of anthropology at Hunter College
of the City University of New York. Focusing on the mutual construction of race and
place in Britain, her work examines the role of localization processes in the formation
of racial categories, communities, and identities, including those that cross national
boundaries and might be called diasporic. Her goal of lending ethnographic depth to
the study of black Atlantic cultures is evident in her book, Dropping Anchor, Setting
Sail: Geographies of Race in Black Liverpool.
TINA M. CAMPT
is associate professor of women’s studies at Duke University. As a
historian of modern Germany and as a feminist oral historian, Campt theorizes
processes of racialization, gendering, and subjecthood in the history of black Germans
during the Third Reich. She is the author of Other Germans: Black Germans and the
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