INTRODUCTION
C A L E N D A R A R T A S A N O B J E C T O F K N O W L E D G E
If we confined ourselves to terms that referred directly or centrally
to the physical object we would be confined to concepts like large,
flat, pigments on a panel . . . perhaps image. We would find it hard
to locate the sort of interest the picture really has for us.
MICHAEL BAXANDALL, PATTERNS OF INTENTION:
ON THE HISTORICAL EXPLANATION OF PICTURES
Aapko Madam is se aur koi ganda topic nahin mila?
[Madam, were you unable to find a worse topic than this?]
CALENDAR PUBLISHER, OLD DELHI
Ternment
heir gaze is everywhere, its benevolence suffusing cash registers, gov-
offices, factory floors, laboratories, schools, buses, kitchens,
streets, tea stalls, dining halls, temples, dams, missiles. If you have lived
in or visited India, or indeed an Indian shop or restaurant anywhere in
the world, you are unlikely to have escaped the purview of the cheap,
mass-produced icons known as ‘‘calendar’’ or ‘‘bazaar’’ art (figs. 1–7).
While the majority depict Hindu deities, there are also images from
India’s many other religions, including Islam, Christianity, and Bud-
dhism, which are often placed for worship in personal shrines. There
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