Notes
Introduction
1
See, for instance, Fredric Jameson, "Periodizing the
60S,"
in Sohnya Sayres, Anders
Stephanson, Stanley Aronowitz, and Fredric Jameson, eds. The
60)5
without Apology
(Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, in cooperation with Social Text)
1984),
pp.
178-209.
Jameson sees the beginnings of the Sixties in the United States as formed
by the seismic shifts in the Third World, and he claims that the Sixties began in
1959
with the Cuban Revolution, but he also notes the assassination ofJohn F. Kennedy
and the fall of Nikita Khrushchev
(1964)
as key events in the political imagination of
postwar radicals and the youth culture. On the other hand, the British journalist and
observer of American politics Godfrey Hodgson writes
(inAmerica in Our Time
[New
York: Random House,
1976],
p.
136)
that
1963
was a watershed year, dividing "a time
of consensus"
(1955-63)
from "a time of crisis"
(1963-65),
which was then followed
by
"a time of polarization"
(1965-68).
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