Index
Note: page numbers in italics refer to illustrations; those followed by “n” indi-
cate endnotes.
Abercrombie, Thomas, 18
Aboriginal Australians, 96
Adams, Abigail, 197n16
affective economies, 3, 8
African Americans, 195n79
ageism, 66–67
aguayo, 82
Ainu, 138–40
Allison, Anne, 106, 109, 159
Alomía Robles, Daniel, 35
ancestral connection narratives, 127–
29
Andean music. See specific topics
Anderson, Benedict, 154, 196n12
anti- and anti- anti- essentialism,
199n7
anticrético, 86
Apache (musician), 20
appropriation, cultural, 30–31, 124–
25, 175
area studies, 150–51, 157–60, 165,
196n2, 197n17. See also inter- area
ethnography
Argentina, 41–44
Arguedas, Alcides, 193n48
Arguedas, José María, 158
Asianization, 22
assimilationism, 140
Atkins, E. Taylor, 101, 142, 195n79
Attali, Jacques, 120
audience expectations: in breaking
out of folklore, 82–83; for enthusi-
asm and energy, 75–78; European
shifts in, 87; school audiences, 57;
in theater performances (Japan),
77–78
Australians, Aboriginal, 96
authenticity: desire for, 158; hobbyists
vs. sojourners and, 121; indigeneity
and, 95; intimacy and, 177; jazz
and, 195n79; judgments about, 30,
93; Peña Naira and, 104; strategies
of, 170; troupe form and, 55. See
also indigeneity, performance of
autograph practices, 118, 162–63, 163
autological subjectivity, 26, 96, 106–
7, 195n92
Ayacucho, Peru, 158
Aymaras, 46, 58, 137. See also indi-
geneity
Bachelet, Michelle, 58
Barrientos, René, 46
Bautista Saavedra, Juan, 193n48
Berlant, Lauren, 25
Boas, Franz, 21, 153, 192n28
bodily practices, imagined similari-
ties in, 127. See also race thinking
and racialized narratives
Bohlman, Philip, 21, 131–32
Bolivia: Chile and, 30–31; closed
revolutionary opening in, 171; coca
production issues, 153; colonialism
and, 133–34; as “culturally rich,”
89; “friendly invasion,” 13–14, 116;
indigenous history and politics in,
10–12, 27, 46–47; Japanese im-
migration to, 14–15; “race war,”
135–36; regionalism in, 54, 137–38,
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