ON NAMING, ROMANIZATION, AND
TRANSLATIONS
Naming is a complex matter in colonial and postcolonial contexts.
Many proper names can be read or rendered in multiple ways in
Korean, Japanese, and variant hybrid forms. When we take into
account pseudonyms, pen names, colonial name changes, and so
forth, each name holds yet more multiplicities. For example, the
author Chang Hyŏkchu is also known as Chō Kakuchū, Noguchi
Kakuchū, Noguchi Minoru, and so on. Following one convention
with consistency for all names would have been impossible in this
book, and while variants are introduced at times, I have often chosen
one rendering per author to reduce confusion.
Romanization of words from Korean, Japanese, and Chinese
follow the McCune Reischauer, Hepburn, and Pinyin systems re-
spectively. Exceptions were made when more commonly known
conventions are available (e.g., Seoul or Tokyo), or in cases when
authors have expressed alternative preferences. Japanese and Korean
terms are sometimes given together with corresponding initials J and
K respectively. Proper names for authors who publish primarily in
Asian languages follow cultural conventions of given names fol-
lowing surnames. Unless otherwise indicated, all translations are
my own.
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