NOTES
Introduction
I
Lawrence Kramer,
Music as Cultural Practice
(Berkeley: University of California
Press,
1990).
See, especially, the chapter "Music as Expressive Doubling?'
2
See Susan McClary,
Feminine Endings
(Minneapolis: University of Minnesota
Press,
1991);
and Julia Kristeva,
Powers of Horror,
trans. Leon S. Roudiez (New
York: Columbia University Press,
1982);
and Carolyn Abbate,
Unsung Voices
(Princeton: Princeton University Press,
1991).
3
V. Kofi Agawu,
Playing with Signs
(Princeton: Princeton University Press,
1991).
4
The distinction between musical things and spaces is similar to a distinction in
semiotics between a "speaking subject" and a "subject of the speech?' See Emile
Benveniste,
Problems of General Linguistics,
trans. Mary Elizabeth Meek (Coral
Gables, Fla.: University of Miami Press,
1971).
See also Kaja Silverman,
The Sub-
ject of Semiotics
(New York: Oxford University Press,
1982), 43-48,
and
195-98.
For
a discussion of the relation between signifiers and ideology, see Louis Althusser,
"Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes toward an Investigation),"
in
Lenin and Philosophy,
trans. Ben Brewster (New York: Monthly Review Press,
1971),
reprinted in
Mapping Ideologies,
ed. Slavoj Zizek (New York: Verso,
1994).
See also Slavoj ZiZek,
Metastases of Enjoyment
(London: Verso,
1994),57-62.
I
Music as Sonorous Envelope and Acoustic Mirror
I
For a discussion of oceanic fantasies and subjectivity, see Sigmund Freud,
Civili-
zation and Its Discontents,
trans. and ed. James Strachey (New York: Norton,
1961).
2
See, in particular, Kaja Silverman,
The Acoustic Mirror
(Bloomington: Indiana Uni-
versity Press,
1988);
Michel Chion,
La
voix
au cinima
(Paris: Cahiers du cinema,
1982);
and, for an introduction to sound and cinema, "Cinema/Sound;'
Yale French
Studies,
no.
60 (1980).
See also Slavoj ZiZek,
Looking Awry
(Cambridge, Mass.:
MIT Press,
1991), 40.
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