A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S
‘‘An anthropologist has usually called on the assistance, imposed
on the patience, and trespassed on the hospitality of many by the
time his work reaches print, and the least he can do,’’ notes Dyson-
Hudson (1966: ix) in his classic on the pastoralist politics of north-
eastern Uganda, ‘‘is to make some acknowledgement of the fact.’’
I, too, am indebted to so many people, first and foremost my
family. They are now deeply involved with Uganda and my re-
search e√orts, to me an illustration of the true nature of anthro-
pology; that is, to bring worlds together. My parents, Kerstin and
Orvar Finnström, visited me in Uganda. And together with my
siblings with families—Åsa, Leif, Sara, Hanna, Torkel, Birgitta, and
Fabian—they have wholeheartedly welcomed Ugandan friends
to Sweden. Most important and every day, Helena Edin gives me
strength and peace, in Sweden, Uganda, and everywhere. Without
her support and love this book would have been completely
impossible.
My journey into anthropology started at the Department of
Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Uppsala University. Per
Brandström introduced me to anthropology and showed me what
it could be. He nurtured my doubts and encouraged me to try my
own thoughts. I have also profited greatly from friends, col-
leagues, and comembers of the department’s Living Beyond Con-
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