NOTES
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introduction
Silverman, Berger, and Conser, The Last Remaining Seats, 74.
Keye Luke, born in 1904 in Guangzhou, China, grew up in Seattle
before moving to Los Angeles. He began his career as a commercial artist
creating film publicity posters, and he is best known for his recurring role as
Lee Chan, Charlie Chan’s ‘‘Number One Son’’ in the Charlie Chan films of
the 1930s and 1940s. He was the only Asian American actor to play a lead
Asian detective in a Hollywood film during those decades, when he took
over the role of Mr. Wong from Boris Karlo√ in Phantom of Chinatown
(Rosen, 1940).
Helgesen, ‘‘Grauman’s Chinese Theatre Hollywood,’’ 3.
Ralph Flint, ‘‘Hollywood Impressions,’’ New York Times, 30 October
1927, X6.
Ibid.
For an analysis of the significance of Egyptian motifs in cinema, see
Lant, ‘‘The Curse of the Pharaohs.’’
π For a helpful explication of this concept, which is discussed through-
out Laplanche’s oeuvre and which I invoke throughout this book, see
Fletcher, ‘‘The Letter in the Unconscious.’’ Leo Bersani also provides a suc-
cinct description of this concept, as follows: ‘‘The enigmatic signifier is a call
like this: an adult addresses the infant with some message. For Laplanche
the infant experiences this message as threatening . . . So how does the infant
respond to these enigmatic signifiers? Laplanche says that it responds by
taking the mass of what it cannot understand and making it unconscious’’
(Bersani et al., ‘‘A Conversation with Leo Bersani,’’ 7–8).
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