index
Illustrations are indicated by italicized page numbers.
Aargo, Dominique, 417n11
Abbe, Ernst, 52
Abbe’s law, 471n48
abjection, 212, 444n37
able-bodiedness, 158
accountability: agency and, 215, 216,
218; as at core of scientific practice,
37; di√erential accountability in
knowing, 380; for exclusions, 184,
394; objectivity as accountability and
responsibility to what is real, 91, 178,
184, 340, 361, 390; as part of fabric of
the world, 182; and power asymme-
tries, 219; on shop floor, 238; think-
ing in terms of what matters and
what is excluded from mattering,
220. See also responsibility
action-at-a-distance, 315, 318
actor network theory, 56, 2156, 445n40
Adams, Alice, 193
Adventures of a Danish Student, The
(Møller), 407n17
agency, 175–79; and accountability, 215,
216, 218; agency of observation, 114–
15, 118, 119, 120, 121, 127–28, 174,
195–96; agential realism for rethink-
ing, 26, 33, 66, 68, 172, 230, 393;
Butler on, 213–14; as cut loose from
humanism, 177–78, 235; as enact-
ment, 178, 214; exclusions opening
space of, 179, 181, 182; fetal, 215–18;
‘‘flow’’ metaphor for, 140, 429n19;
intra-action as reworking of, 177, 184,
235; as intra-active, 33, 178, 214, 235;
Kelvin on natural, 231; in liberal
humanist conception of the subject,
172; machinic, 238–39; material
dimensions of, 211; matter as agen-
tive, 170, 177, 178, 180, 183; as never
ending, 177, 235; nonhuman, 212–
20, 445n43; as not on-o√ a√air, 172,
234; as ongoing reconfigurings of t
world, 141; performativity and soci
and political, 59–66; and possibilit
182, 218, 230; relational and mutua
entangled, 33; rethinking in terms
complementarity, 23; space as agen
of change, 224; subjectivity and, 17
216–17
agential cuts: agential separability an
175; apparatuses enacting, 148, 176
326; boundaries and properties
becoming determinate only throug
337, 340, 345; description in terms
mixtures enabled by, 348; di√erent
cuts produce di√erent phenomena,
175, 178; as di√erentially enacted,
376; as enacting resolution within
phenomena, 140, 333–34, 343, 345
348, 350, 351; ethics and, 178–79;
world characterizing itself through
di√erent, 432n42
agential realism, 132–85; toward agen
tial realist understanding of appara
tuses, 145–46; Butler’s theory of pe
formativity compared with, 151, 20
11; causality rather than correspon-
dence in, 44–45; constructivism an
traditional realism undercut by,
408n1; di√erent materialities probl
circumvented by, 211; on discourse
and material world, 33–34; as dive
ing from theories that acknowledg
materiality solely as e√ect, 225–26;
emendation and elaboration of
Bohr’s philosophy-physics, 66–70,
134–37; ethics as understood in, 37
391–96; and forces (both natural a
social) taken into account, 33; as
going beyond performativity theori
that focus exclusively on human/
social realm, 225; intra-action as k
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