About the Series
Latin America Otherwise: Languages, Empires, Nations is a critical
It aims to explore the emergence and consequences of concepts us
define ‘‘Latin America’’ while at the same time exploring the broad
play of political, economic, and cultural practices that have shaped
Americanworlds.LatinAmerica,atthecrossroadsofcompetingim
designs and local responses, has been construed as a geocultural and
political entity since the nineteenth century. This series provides a
ing point to redefine Latin America as a configuration of politica
guistic, cultural, and economic intersections that demands a conti
reappraisal of the role of the Americas in history, and of the ongoin
cess of globalization and the relocation of people and cultures tha
characterized Latin America’s experience. Latin America Otherwise:
guages, Empires, Nations is a forum that confronts established geocu
constructions, that rethinks area studies and disciplinary boundarie
assesses convictions of the academy and of public policy, and that,
spondingly,demandsthatthepracticesthroughwhichweproducek
edge and understanding about and from Latin America be subject t
orous and critical scrutiny.
In this pathbreaking study, Irene Silverblatt makes a number of
relatedarguments.ShetakesHannahArendt’sinsightsintotheorig
a modernity that allowed ‘‘civilized’’ peoples to embrace fascism an
pliesthemtothesixteenthandseventeenthcenturies,whenSpanish
nialism dominated the globe. Professor Silverblatt joins Latin Am
scholars like sociologist Anibal Quijano and philosopher Enrique D
in arguing that ‘‘modernity’’ originated with the Spanish/Christia
toryovertheMoors,theexpulsionoftheJewsfromtheIberianpeni
and, simultaneously, the colonization of ‘‘Indians’’ and the slave
Thisconfluenceofeventssetthestageforthedevelopmentofacapi
g
2004.8.17
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Silverblatt
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MODERN
INQUISITIONS
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