Acknowledgments
The written word always belies the many hands that have gone in
making.This project has been a long time coming, and many peopl
theyears have been midwives to its extended birth. I hope I remem
acknowledge you all.
Without the generosity of several funding sources, I would neve
beenabletofullyresearchthisbook—trackdownthePeruvianInqui
records,findearly-printbooks,anduncoverotherrelevantdocumen
records. A Rockefeller Foundation fellowship at the University of
land’s Latin American Studies Center, whose director is Saul Sosno
gave me support and encouragement when the project was in its e
stages.AGuggenheimFoundationfellowship,comingjustwhenIn
it, let me finish all basic research and delve into the analytical pr
Finally,withafellowshipfromtheRadcliffeInstituteforAdvanced
at Harvard University—and benefiting from the great encouragem
and conversations with Drew Gilpin Faust, the founding Dean of t
stitute, Judy Wishniak, Director of the Fellowship Program, and a
pals—I managed to finish a first draft.
Several conferences and edited volumes provided the deadlines n
to jolt me into writing. The McNeil Center for Early American S
andtheOmohundroInstituteof EarlyAmericanHistoryandCultu
sponsored a conference exploring comparative colonial histories th
sultedin PossiblePasts:BecomingColonialinEarlyAmerica,editedby
ert Blair St. George. ‘‘The Inca’sWitches: Genderand the Cultural
of Colonization in Seventeenth-Century Peru,’’ much improved by
ert’s help, forced me to confront the witchcraft trials.Wonderful d
sions at the Johns Hopkins Women’s Studies Seminar contributed
to the revised version published here, and I owe a special thank-y
Jonathan Goldberg and Michael Moon for their insights and gener
g
2004.8.17
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