Acrostics (ka bshad), 6, 8, 191, 200 n. 48,
267, 282
African literature, 58 n. 27, 307, 321–22;
modern Tibetan literature vs., 48, 59
n. 44, 196, 218, 318. See also Colonial-
ism
Alai (A legs), xxix, 59 n. 52, 177, 180,
227; ethnic identity and, 50, 225,
226, 230, 233, 234 n. 13; Red Poppies
(Chen’ai luoding), xxi, xxx, 182, 204,
225–33
Allegories, 75–76, 228
Amdo (A mdo): as literary subject, 21,
29 n. 65, 31 n. 100, 45, 52; ethnic
composition of, 38; predominance of
writers in, xxxi, xxxiv n. 4, 49; pub-
lishing in, xxv
American literature. See European and
North American literature
Amnye Machen Institute, xxviii, 289,
295, 296–97, 300, 322
Anglophone writers, xxxii, 291–95. See
also individual writers
Anyön Trashi Döndrup, 153, 166 n. 49,
168 n. 78, 237; The Sound of Autumn
(Ston gyi rang sgra), 248–51
Aphorisms (legs bshad), xvii, 89, 200
n. 48, 282
Autobiographies, xviii, xxxvi n. 22, 59
n. 45, 226; “daily accounts” (nyin
tho), 68
Bhuchung D. Sonam, 293, 326 n. 66
Bilingual writers, 178, 182–84
Blang dor (selectivity), 88, 96, 100, 105
Borges, Jorge Luís, xxi, 307, 320
Censorship, 45, 163 n. 14, 168 n. 67,
187, 223 n. 41, 224 n. 49, 319; avoid-
ing, 216–18; Weise and, xvi, xxxv n. 9,
xxxv n. 12
Chab shog, 11
Chen Rangsé, 138, 142
Chinese Communist Party (CCP): dis-
illusionment with, 45, 48, 114–16,
204; education and, xxiv, 23, 174; first
generation of writers and, 14–22,
39–45; language and, 61–62, 136,
174–75, 244, 255; as literary subject,
14–17, 20, 39–45, 149, 165 n. 29, 207,
213, 214, 217, 222 n. 35, 223 n. 42,
232; religion and tradition attacked
by, 95, 114, 155–57, 158, 168 n. 65,
169 n. 67, 216, 223 n. 41; sanctioned
literature and, xxvii, xxxii, 3, 67,
71–73, 76, 81, 92, 319; Yan’an Talks,
34, 39
Chinese writers, 39; literary innovation
by, 64, 203, 208; Tibetan writers
influenced by, 141, 182, 190, 269;
Tibetan writers’ influence on, 219
Chögyam Trungpa, 283, 293, 294
Colonialism, 158, 303, 314; British, 320,
Index
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