INDEX
Note: Italicized numbers indicate a figure;
n indicates an endnote
ability and disability, 14, 74, 76, 85
Agamben, Giorgio, 12 13,
197 98nn122 123
airports, vii–ix, 10, 11, 44, 146n41, 160n30
America: attachment to the land of the
indigenous Indians of, 26; colonial
as a site of excessive movement, 8, 9;
European land-grabbing from the in-
digenous populace of, 87; Hobbes’s fi-
nancial interests in, 173n46; Hobbes’s
view of as a “no man’s land,” 97 98;
Hobbes’s view of as a place of exces-
sive movement, 96 97; the immigra-
tion to as a product of mobility and
immobility in Europe, 107 8; Locke’s
analysis of colonial versus Indian land
use in, 103 6, 176n75, 178 79n97;
Locke’s financial interests in, 173n46,
175 76n66; Locke’s view of as a
place of excessive movement, 78, 101,
110 11, 183n125; Locke’s view of as
archetypical of the “state of nature,”
101, 174 75n63; Locke’s view of as a
vacant place, 78, 101, 102 3, 110 11;
nineteenth-century suffragists in,
65; racial discrimination in, 1, 10,
142 43n8, 200 201n5
American Indians: as archetypes of
mankind in the state of nature, 102,
171 72n26, 199n133; colonial justifica-
tions for land-grabbing from, 102 5,
107, 109 11, 176n75, 177n84, 177n90,
182 83n123; Hobbes’s portrayal of as
barbarians and savages, 97, 99 100,
154n15, 173n47, 174n58; Locke’s
portrayal of as barbarians and sav-
ages, 101, 105, 182n120, 182 83n123;
Locke’s portrayal of as prototypes
of the free and rational man, 98 99,
102, 105, 177n90, 178n95; the Myth
of Nomadism, 5, 26, 78, 103 4, 106
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