notes
I N T R O D U C T I O N
1 El País (July 10, 1994), http:// elpais . com / diario / 1994 / 07 / 10 / cultura/773791206
_ 850215 . html. All translations in this book are mine, unless other wise noted.
2 Sosa’s relationship with Parra and other Latin American folk singers is discussed in
chapter 5.
3 Appadurai, Modernity at Large, 3.
4 Ortiz, “Mundialization/Globalization,” 401–3. The fuller statement of Ortiz’s con-
ception is in Ortiz, Mundialización y cultura. For a similar perspective, see Erlmann,
“The Aesthetics of the Global Imagination.”
5 García Canclini, Imagined Globalization, 28.
6 Corona and Madrid, “Introduction,” 5.
7 Sublette, Cuba and Its Music, xiii.
8 For an account of this cultural exchange focused on Latin American dance history,
see Chasteen, National Rhythms, African Roots.
9 Suisman, Selling Sounds, 269.
10 Miller, Segregating Sound, 170–74. On the role of local intermediaries, see, for ex-
ample, McCann, Hello, Hello Brazil, 137–45.
11 Miller, Segregating Sound, 167–80.
12 Desfile Musical Odeón Columbia 9:91 (May 1942).
13 Karush, Culture of Class, 48–59.
14 Yúdice, “La industria de la música en la integración América Latina- Estados Uni-
dos”; Ochoa Gauthier and Yúdice, “The Latin American Music Industry in an Era of
Crisis.”
15 García Canclini, Imagined Globalization, 133. On Miami pop, see also Party, “The
Miamization of Latin American Pop Music”; Cepeda, Musical ImagiNation, 35–60.
16 On the circulation of tango in the United States, see Matallana, El tango entre dos
Américas. On tango exoticism in Paris and New York, see Savigliano, Tango and the
Po liti cal Economy of Passion.
17 Chasteen, National Rhythms, African Roots, 135–37.
18 Poppe, “Made in Joinville,” 491–92.
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