Index
Abu- Lughod, Lila, 6–7, 283, 291, 341
African cultural heritage, 21, 23, 109–14
Afro- Brazilian religions. See Candomblé
agency, 161–62, 208–9, 306–7
agrarian reform in Mexico, 208, 214, 219,
231; alternative land grants, 298; new
laws governing, 297–98; new types of,
296–301; postrevolutionary, 290–92,
296, 298–99. See also Unión de Comu-
neros “Emiliano Zapata”
amparo (land rights suits) as resistance,
208, 290–91; alternative land grants
and, 297–98; boundary disputes and,
295–98; factionalism and, 294–96, 301;
intragovernmental disputes and, 292–
93; new agrarian laws and, 297–98; new
types of land reform caused by, 296–
97, 301; selective land purchases and,
299–300; subaltern- elite dichotomy
and, 293–94, 301
anthropology, 4, 28–29, 51, 325, 350–51
anticlericalism, 169, 185, 189–90. See also
Cristero Rebellion; Union of Mexican
Catholic Ladies
antisyncretism movement, 153–54
Argentinian food riots (2001), 3
Asemblea Popular de los Pueblos de
Oaxaca (appo), 316, 319–21
assimilation and resistance, 144–48
Auyero, Javier, 3
Ayotitlán, 206; ancient origins of, 239, 248;
belief in ancestors (los señores) in,
238–39; community workshops and,
237–39; ejido of, 235; ethnic identity
and, 232, 234–35, 246–47; ethnogenesis
of, 239, 247; land rights fight of, 234–
36; Manantlán Biosphere Reserve and,
233, 236–37, 240–41, 242; religious fes-
tivals of, 239; Sierra de Manantlán set-
ting of, 232–33; testimonies of Ayotitlán
subjectivities, 239–48; traditional arts
and crafts of, 238; traditional medical
practices of, 238; University of Guadala-
jara researchers and, 236–38, 240
Bahia (Brazilian state), 269; tourism and
Candomblé in, 144, 150–52; urban
housing reform in, 270–71
Bairro da Paz: alliances between commu-
nity actors in, 285; associations and
community in, 282–83; black youth
groups and, 281–82, 285–86; Catholic
Church and, 278–79; Center for Studies
and Social Action and, 273; Conselho
de Moradores (resident council) and,
277–78; crèches in, 275–76; ethnogene-
sis in, 275; Evangelicals and, 279–81;
hidden resistance in, 283–86; Ladê
Padê Mim (Candomblé terreiro), 279–
80; Malvinas invasion in, 273–74; new
types of community leadership in, 277–
82; Plaza of Decisions in, 274–75; reli-
gious networks in, 278–81; resistance
and power relations in, 283–87; sub-
altern official transcripts in, 286–87;
tourism and development and, 271–72;
as “urban quilombo,” 207
Bastide, Roger, 145–46
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